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Chef-owner Hamid in the kitchen at Namak Mandi, a Pakistani restaurant in Tooting, south London
Chef-owner Hamid in the kitchen at Namak Mandi in Tooting

The Best Places to Eat Pakistani Food in London

From the Whitechapel icons, to Pashtun cooking in Tooting, and outstanding halwa puri in Aldersbrook

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Chef-owner Hamid in the kitchen at Namak Mandi in Tooting

The plethora of London’s Pakistani restaurants may not necessarily be characterised as hotbeds of culinary innovation but they have nourished and sustained a working class migrant community for generations. Pakistanis are the second-largest ethnic minority population in the U.K. and a large number reside in London. The 1950s and 1960s saw large-scale migration from parts of Pakistani to the U.K. primarily driven by demand for low-skilled labour in manufacturing industries in Britain during the post-war period.

A majority of the migrants were men from Punjab and Pakistan-administered Kashmir who had left behind families in Pakistan. They brought with them memories of dishes they had grown up eating but rarely cooked. Some enterprising workers established the early Pakistani restaurants looking for additional opportunities to support themselves and send remittances back home, often living in quarters above the restaurants. These establishments initially catered to single, working class Pakistani men who hankered for an affordable hot meal of roti and daal. A lot has changed since then. The second- and third-generation British Pakistanis have access to better education and economic opportunities and more recent waves of migration from Pakistan tend to characterised by higher skilled professionals. As a result, the current Pakistani diaspora in London is incredibly diverse across ethnic and class lines and this is reflected in who owns and runs Pakistani restaurants as well as who dines there. A quiet disruption of the male-dominated curry house model has also been taking place in recent years with women entrepreneurs and chefs setting up Pakistani restaurants to showcase home-style cooking and more regional flavours — thereby shifting the established contours of Pakistani food in Britain.

While Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London, in a nod to his Pakistani roots, has alluded to his favourite Pakistani haunts for lamb chops and masala fish, Pakistani restaurants by and large have not received the attention and exploration they richly deserve. They are often eclipsed by the preponderance of Indian restaurants in the city — a country better known to Londoners in cultural terms. Pakistan is hardly a tourist hotspot and few Londoners have visited the country unless they have Pakistani roots. As a result, there is no reference point for the cuisine and limited understanding of its regional diversity. Yet London’s Pakistani restaurants, by no means a monolith, continue to thrive as purveyors of unpretentious, quality, and affordable cuisine and as spaces that cultivate community and embody generosity.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Aladin Kebabish

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147-149 W Hendon Broadway, Hendon
London NW9 7EA, UK

The name of this North London establishment may suggest Arabian Nights themed revelry but Aladin Kababish is truly Pakistani at heart. Aladin excels in the unhurried preparation of haleem, a dish that is renowned for its labour intensive preparation involving hours of slow cooking and pounding lentils, wheat, barley and lamb in a circular motion till they form glutinous strands. Another star attraction is nihaari, a lamb shank curry almost velvety in texture which is slowly cooked overnight for the connective tissue to melt down completely. Garnished with coriander, thin shards of ginger, and green chillies, it used to be prescribed as a cure for common colds in the 19th century due its throat and nasal passages clearing properties. The dish’s name is derived from the Arabic word nahaar, or daytime, which alludes to the fact that it’s traditionally eaten for breakfast. Often served with spoonfuls of brain and marrow (for extra fortification), nihaari is notorious for running out by noon in dedicated nihaari houses in Pakistan but at Aladin Kababish it can be enjoyed all day long. (No alcohol.)

Curry at Aladin Kebabish, one of the best value restaurants in west London
Aladin Kebabish

2. Al Kareem Sweets & Bakers London

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731 Romford Rd, Aldersbrook
London E12 5AW, UK
020 8478 4433

On a rainy Sunday morning, Al Kareem Sweets and Bakers heaves with ravenous diners jostling for space and attention in the tiny seating area. Conversations spark between strangers sharing tables who alternate between Urdu and Punjabi to express their views, variously, on the state of economic affairs in the motherland or bemoan the Pakistan cricket team’s dismal recent performance. Essentially a mithai shop serving a variety of sweetmeats, pastries, and packaged snacks; on Sundays, only Al Kareem serves two varieties of breakfast platters that have people queuing outside, even in inclement weather: halwa puri and chana pathoora. Opt for the halwa puri platter and witness, live, the action of puri preparation on a meticulously arranged assembly line. Balls of kneaded flour are rolled out, slapped between the hands to be shaped into discs and then spun into in a bubbling cauldron of oil for a few seconds before they emerge expanded balloon-like. Puris are served alongside stewed potatoes with a liberal sprinkling of nigella seeds, masala chickpeas, pickled onions, and moist semolina halwa with a marigold hue. Finish off with a salty pink Kashmiri chai topped with crushed pistachios. (No alcohol.)

Halwa Puri at Al Kareem in Aldersbrook, east London
Halwa Puri at Al Kareem
Rida Bilgrami

3. Lahori Nihaari London

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50 Plashet Grove, Upton Park
London E6 1AE, UK
020 8586 9148

There is a steady inflow of families to Lahore Nihari following Friday prayers with men returning from the local mosque accompanied by their wives and children. It is easy to see why this restaurant is such a magnet for the local community: In addition to the nihari which is excellent, the menu shines a light on lesser known Pakistani fare such as bhindi gosht (lamb cooked with okra) and aloo qeema (minced lamb and potato). Every Pakistani household prepares a version of these in their kitchens but having to compete with showstoppers like karahis, qormas, and tikkas, these humble dishes are rare on restaurant menus. It’s difficult to go wrong with aloo qeema — the quintessential comfort food combining diced potatoes with minced lamb in a reduction of tomatoes heady with notes of cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and black pepper. (No alcohol.)

Lahori Nihaari in Upton Park, east London
Lahori Nihaari
Rida Bilgrami

4. Original Lahore Restaurant

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2-4 Gateforth St, Marylebone
London NW8 8EH, UK

A residential area at the nexus of St John’s Wood and Marylebone may seem like an unlikely location for a Pakistani restaurant but the fact that it is always packed, even outside of meal hours, is testament to its popularity. It’s possible, on occasion, to spot Indian and Pakistani cricket legends who stop by for platters of lamb chops and seekh kababs after a long day of commentary at the nearby Lord’s cricket ground. Feast on the mixed grill of tandoori chicken wings, lamb tikka, seekh kababs, and lamb chops that come in a sizzling platter with a whirl of smoke and the aroma of caramelising onions. The nihari and paya (trotters) available only on weekends are among the city’s best. So too are karahi koftas, lamb meatballs swimming elegantly in a spicy tomato gravy, served as a chef’s special only on Tuesdays. (BYOB.)

5. Tayyabs

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83-89 Fieldgate St, Whitechapel
London E1 1JU, UK

Tayyabs might be home to one of East London’s longest queues but all for good reason — it’s set the standard for Punjabi cuisine since it first opened its doors in 1972. Come for the chef’s special, chicken tikka masala, lamb chops and lamb-stuffed keema naan, cool down with London’s best mango lassi and Kheer, a rich milky rice pudding. The energy’s not unlike a street bazaar: heaving. Given it’s likely one will be barely able to hear their fellow diners, it’s also the perfect pit-stop to people-watch. It’s well worth booking a spot in advance though or prepare to wait a while come the weekend.

Lamb chops at Tayyabs, a classic London restaurant Tayyabs/Facebook

6. Needoo Grill

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87 New Rd, Whitechapel
London E1 1HH, UK

Nearby Tayabbs might get all the East End glory but avoid Whitechapel’s longest queues for its best-kept secret. Feast on generous portions of its famed mixed grill — sizzling lamb chops, chicken tikka and seekh kebabs — and even better karahi gosht, as Bollywood music plays in the background. With a diverse veg offering (the chilli paneer tikka is a stand-out) and speedy service to boot, it’s not hard to see why Needo Grill was awarded east London’s best Pakistani restaurant last December

7. SHOLA Karachi Kitchen

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SHOLA Unit 6 Media Works, Wood Ln, White City
London W12 7FP, UK

Leiths-trained chef Aida Khan hosted a television travel show in Pakistan that took her across the country documenting the regional breadth of Pakistan’s culinary repertoire before relocating to London to start a series of supper clubs. Her first restaurant Shola Karachi Kitchen aims to showcase how Pakistani food can be both nutritious and hearty. There are no unctuous curries on the menu, yet the flavours and preparation is rooted in traditional cooking techniques. The charcoal grilled lamb shoulder, with hints of pepper and cinnamon has the requisite level of pleasing smokiness. The chicken karahi, a staple on Pakistani dining tables that requires honing in on the ratio of ginger, garlic, and tomato to create the right balance is very well executed at Shola. The tangy khatti daal and tamatar ka cut — dishes that are typically found in home kitchens of Hyderabadi families in Karachi — are an ode to the city’s cosmopolitan nature and its diversity of immigrant cuisines. Go for the food but stay for the inviting pastel interiors and a memorable playlist that alternates between evergreen ghazals and 90s Pakistani pop music. Serves alcohol.

SHOLA Karachi Kitchen in White City, west London
SHOLA Karachi Kitchen
Rida Bilgrami

8. Masala Wala Cafe

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5 Brockley Cross
London SE4 2AB, UK

Established by mother-daughter duo Nabeela Muqadiss and Saima Thompson in 2015, Masala Wala Café serves home-style Punjabi cooking with a focus on seasonality and simplicity. The menu, which changes changes every month, spotlights vegan and vegetarian dishes (in addition to a lamb and chicken dish) such as kuddu channa (pumpkin and chickpeas cooked with cumin), saag shakurkundi (spinach and sweet potato), and gobi ki sabzi (cauliflower, sweetcorn, and kale cooked with mustard seeds). The claim of home-cooked food is a misnomer in many food establishments but not here. The dining experience at Masala Wala mirrors the warm hospitality one might receive when turning up at a Pakistani household unannounced. The hearty fare is best washed down with the bespoke Pakistani Pale Ale prepared by Brockley Brewery.

Masala Wala Food in Brockley
Masala Wala
Rida Bilgrami

9. Taste of Pakistan Restaurant and Take away

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369 Hanworth Rd
Hounslow TW4 5LF, UK
020 8572 1298

Taste of Pakistan is a misleading name for a restaurant that specialises in cuisine from the Northwest region of the country. No matter, this is where to have a transcendental experience, feasting on copious amounts of chapli kabab and charsi karahi — a dish of tender cubes of lamb, simmered in a tomato reduction lacquered with fat. The affable and welcoming owner clearly takes pride in his cooking and advises ordering medium spicy rather than spicy so that the flavour of the meat and fat comes through. (No alcohol.)

10. Namak Mandi

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25 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting
London SW17 7TS, UK
020 8767 6120

Namak Mandi is one of the few restaurants in London to specialise in Pashtun cuisine from Northwest Pakistan, a region that borders Afghanistan. The cuisine, which is heavily influenced by Afghan and Central Asian culinary traditions, is characterised by the use of limited ingredients, delicate spicing, and a focus on fatty meats that are important fuel in the region’s harsh winters. Flattened beef chapli kababs the size of frisbees are speckled with coriander seeds, red chilli flakes, and tomatoes — fried on high heat to ensure a charred and crispy exterior while maintaining a juicy interior. The cooked-to-order karahis with tender pieces of lamb or chicken simmered in tomatoes, salt, pepper, and ginger are legendary as is the kabuli pulao with lamb shank falling off the bone buried under a dome of rice. Reserve the upstairs communal seating section and take a group of four to six friends to order most of the menu. Enjoy the spread with oblong naans that tower over. (No alcohol.)

Kabuli pulao at Namak Mandi, a sweet and savoury rice at meat dish, with Afghan influences, served at Namak Mandi, a Pakistani restaurant in Tooting, south London
Kabuli pulao at Namak Mandi
Ejatu Shaw

11. Spice Village Tooting

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32-36 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting
London SW17 7PD, UK

Stepping into Spice Village feels a bit like entering an opulent Pakistani wedding hall — an auspicious sign. Any South Asian will say that weddings are as much about having a feast as they are about blessing a romantic union. The highlights here include masala fish — cod fillet marinated in a gram flour batter with carom seeds, cumin, red chilli, pepper, and lemon juice — and the daal gosht, a winter warmer of lamb cooked in chana daal with a blend of spices. (No alcohol.)

12. Karachi Cuisine

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1113-1115 London Rd, Norbury
London SW16 4XD, UK

Karachi Cuisine prides itself in having chefs and staff that all hail from Karachi, Pakistan’s largest metropolis. It comes as no surprise that it is one of the few Pakistani restaurants in London serving two of the city’s specialties: kat a kat and maghaz masala. Both dishes epitomise Pakistan’s nose to tail cooking tradition, which has existed for decades, long before the term entered the mainstream discourse in Europe and North America. Maghaz masala, buttery in consistency, are blanched lamb brains simmered in a wok with tomatoes, onions, green peppers, and ginger. Kat a kat refers to the sound of two sharp blades that hit the griddle as the chef dexterously dices and minces a medley of brain, liver, kidneys, and heart and tosses it with onions, tomatoes and spices including aniseed, mace and cumin. (BYOB.)

Kat a Kat at Karachi Cuisine in Norbury, south west London
Kat a Kat at Karachi Cuisine
Rida Bilgrami

1. Aladin Kebabish

147-149 W Hendon Broadway, Hendon, London NW9 7EA, UK
Curry at Aladin Kebabish, one of the best value restaurants in west London
Aladin Kebabish

The name of this North London establishment may suggest Arabian Nights themed revelry but Aladin Kababish is truly Pakistani at heart. Aladin excels in the unhurried preparation of haleem, a dish that is renowned for its labour intensive preparation involving hours of slow cooking and pounding lentils, wheat, barley and lamb in a circular motion till they form glutinous strands. Another star attraction is nihaari, a lamb shank curry almost velvety in texture which is slowly cooked overnight for the connective tissue to melt down completely. Garnished with coriander, thin shards of ginger, and green chillies, it used to be prescribed as a cure for common colds in the 19th century due its throat and nasal passages clearing properties. The dish’s name is derived from the Arabic word nahaar, or daytime, which alludes to the fact that it’s traditionally eaten for breakfast. Often served with spoonfuls of brain and marrow (for extra fortification), nihaari is notorious for running out by noon in dedicated nihaari houses in Pakistan but at Aladin Kababish it can be enjoyed all day long. (No alcohol.)

147-149 W Hendon Broadway, Hendon
London NW9 7EA, UK

2. Al Kareem Sweets & Bakers London

731 Romford Rd, Aldersbrook, London E12 5AW, UK
Halwa Puri at Al Kareem in Aldersbrook, east London
Halwa Puri at Al Kareem
Rida Bilgrami

On a rainy Sunday morning, Al Kareem Sweets and Bakers heaves with ravenous diners jostling for space and attention in the tiny seating area. Conversations spark between strangers sharing tables who alternate between Urdu and Punjabi to express their views, variously, on the state of economic affairs in the motherland or bemoan the Pakistan cricket team’s dismal recent performance. Essentially a mithai shop serving a variety of sweetmeats, pastries, and packaged snacks; on Sundays, only Al Kareem serves two varieties of breakfast platters that have people queuing outside, even in inclement weather: halwa puri and chana pathoora. Opt for the halwa puri platter and witness, live, the action of puri preparation on a meticulously arranged assembly line. Balls of kneaded flour are rolled out, slapped between the hands to be shaped into discs and then spun into in a bubbling cauldron of oil for a few seconds before they emerge expanded balloon-like. Puris are served alongside stewed potatoes with a liberal sprinkling of nigella seeds, masala chickpeas, pickled onions, and moist semolina halwa with a marigold hue. Finish off with a salty pink Kashmiri chai topped with crushed pistachios. (No alcohol.)

731 Romford Rd, Aldersbrook
London E12 5AW, UK

3. Lahori Nihaari London

50 Plashet Grove, Upton Park, London E6 1AE, UK
Lahori Nihaari in Upton Park, east London
Lahori Nihaari
Rida Bilgrami

There is a steady inflow of families to Lahore Nihari following Friday prayers with men returning from the local mosque accompanied by their wives and children. It is easy to see why this restaurant is such a magnet for the local community: In addition to the nihari which is excellent, the menu shines a light on lesser known Pakistani fare such as bhindi gosht (lamb cooked with okra) and aloo qeema (minced lamb and potato). Every Pakistani household prepares a version of these in their kitchens but having to compete with showstoppers like karahis, qormas, and tikkas, these humble dishes are rare on restaurant menus. It’s difficult to go wrong with aloo qeema — the quintessential comfort food combining diced potatoes with minced lamb in a reduction of tomatoes heady with notes of cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and black pepper. (No alcohol.)

50 Plashet Grove, Upton Park
London E6 1AE, UK

4. Original Lahore Restaurant

2-4 Gateforth St, Marylebone, London NW8 8EH, UK

A residential area at the nexus of St John’s Wood and Marylebone may seem like an unlikely location for a Pakistani restaurant but the fact that it is always packed, even outside of meal hours, is testament to its popularity. It’s possible, on occasion, to spot Indian and Pakistani cricket legends who stop by for platters of lamb chops and seekh kababs after a long day of commentary at the nearby Lord’s cricket ground. Feast on the mixed grill of tandoori chicken wings, lamb tikka, seekh kababs, and lamb chops that come in a sizzling platter with a whirl of smoke and the aroma of caramelising onions. The nihari and paya (trotters) available only on weekends are among the city’s best. So too are karahi koftas, lamb meatballs swimming elegantly in a spicy tomato gravy, served as a chef’s special only on Tuesdays. (BYOB.)

2-4 Gateforth St, Marylebone
London NW8 8EH, UK

5. Tayyabs

83-89 Fieldgate St, Whitechapel, London E1 1JU, UK
Lamb chops at Tayyabs, a classic London restaurant Tayyabs/Facebook

Tayyabs might be home to one of East London’s longest queues but all for good reason — it’s set the standard for Punjabi cuisine since it first opened its doors in 1972. Come for the chef’s special, chicken tikka masala, lamb chops and lamb-stuffed keema naan, cool down with London’s best mango lassi and Kheer, a rich milky rice pudding. The energy’s not unlike a street bazaar: heaving. Given it’s likely one will be barely able to hear their fellow diners, it’s also the perfect pit-stop to people-watch. It’s well worth booking a spot in advance though or prepare to wait a while come the weekend.

83-89 Fieldgate St, Whitechapel
London E1 1JU, UK

6. Needoo Grill

87 New Rd, Whitechapel, London E1 1HH, UK

Nearby Tayabbs might get all the East End glory but avoid Whitechapel’s longest queues for its best-kept secret. Feast on generous portions of its famed mixed grill — sizzling lamb chops, chicken tikka and seekh kebabs — and even better karahi gosht, as Bollywood music plays in the background. With a diverse veg offering (the chilli paneer tikka is a stand-out) and speedy service to boot, it’s not hard to see why Needo Grill was awarded east London’s best Pakistani restaurant last December

87 New Rd, Whitechapel
London E1 1HH, UK

7. SHOLA Karachi Kitchen

SHOLA Unit 6 Media Works, Wood Ln, White City, London W12 7FP, UK
SHOLA Karachi Kitchen in White City, west London
SHOLA Karachi Kitchen
Rida Bilgrami

Leiths-trained chef Aida Khan hosted a television travel show in Pakistan that took her across the country documenting the regional breadth of Pakistan’s culinary repertoire before relocating to London to start a series of supper clubs. Her first restaurant Shola Karachi Kitchen aims to showcase how Pakistani food can be both nutritious and hearty. There are no unctuous curries on the menu, yet the flavours and preparation is rooted in traditional cooking techniques. The charcoal grilled lamb shoulder, with hints of pepper and cinnamon has the requisite level of pleasing smokiness. The chicken karahi, a staple on Pakistani dining tables that requires honing in on the ratio of ginger, garlic, and tomato to create the right balance is very well executed at Shola. The tangy khatti daal and tamatar ka cut — dishes that are typically found in home kitchens of Hyderabadi families in Karachi — are an ode to the city’s cosmopolitan nature and its diversity of immigrant cuisines. Go for the food but stay for the inviting pastel interiors and a memorable playlist that alternates between evergreen ghazals and 90s Pakistani pop music. Serves alcohol.

SHOLA Unit 6 Media Works, Wood Ln, White City
London W12 7FP, UK

8. Masala Wala Cafe

5 Brockley Cross, London SE4 2AB, UK
Masala Wala Food in Brockley
Masala Wala
Rida Bilgrami

Established by mother-daughter duo Nabeela Muqadiss and Saima Thompson in 2015, Masala Wala Café serves home-style Punjabi cooking with a focus on seasonality and simplicity. The menu, which changes changes every month, spotlights vegan and vegetarian dishes (in addition to a lamb and chicken dish) such as kuddu channa (pumpkin and chickpeas cooked with cumin), saag shakurkundi (spinach and sweet potato), and gobi ki sabzi (cauliflower, sweetcorn, and kale cooked with mustard seeds). The claim of home-cooked food is a misnomer in many food establishments but not here. The dining experience at Masala Wala mirrors the warm hospitality one might receive when turning up at a Pakistani household unannounced. The hearty fare is best washed down with the bespoke Pakistani Pale Ale prepared by Brockley Brewery.

5 Brockley Cross
London SE4 2AB, UK

9. Taste of Pakistan Restaurant and Take away

369 Hanworth Rd, Hounslow TW4 5LF, UK

Taste of Pakistan is a misleading name for a restaurant that specialises in cuisine from the Northwest region of the country. No matter, this is where to have a transcendental experience, feasting on copious amounts of chapli kabab and charsi karahi — a dish of tender cubes of lamb, simmered in a tomato reduction lacquered with fat. The affable and welcoming owner clearly takes pride in his cooking and advises ordering medium spicy rather than spicy so that the flavour of the meat and fat comes through. (No alcohol.)

369 Hanworth Rd
Hounslow TW4 5LF, UK

10. Namak Mandi

25 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting, London SW17 7TS, UK
Kabuli pulao at Namak Mandi, a sweet and savoury rice at meat dish, with Afghan influences, served at Namak Mandi, a Pakistani restaurant in Tooting, south London
Kabuli pulao at Namak Mandi
Ejatu Shaw

Namak Mandi is one of the few restaurants in London to specialise in Pashtun cuisine from Northwest Pakistan, a region that borders Afghanistan. The cuisine, which is heavily influenced by Afghan and Central Asian culinary traditions, is characterised by the use of limited ingredients, delicate spicing, and a focus on fatty meats that are important fuel in the region’s harsh winters. Flattened beef chapli kababs the size of frisbees are speckled with coriander seeds, red chilli flakes, and tomatoes — fried on high heat to ensure a charred and crispy exterior while maintaining a juicy interior. The cooked-to-order karahis with tender pieces of lamb or chicken simmered in tomatoes, salt, pepper, and ginger are legendary as is the kabuli pulao with lamb shank falling off the bone buried under a dome of rice. Reserve the upstairs communal seating section and take a group of four to six friends to order most of the menu. Enjoy the spread with oblong naans that tower over. (No alcohol.)

25 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting
London SW17 7TS, UK

11. Spice Village Tooting

32-36 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting, London SW17 7PD, UK

Stepping into Spice Village feels a bit like entering an opulent Pakistani wedding hall — an auspicious sign. Any South Asian will say that weddings are as much about having a feast as they are about blessing a romantic union. The highlights here include masala fish — cod fillet marinated in a gram flour batter with carom seeds, cumin, red chilli, pepper, and lemon juice — and the daal gosht, a winter warmer of lamb cooked in chana daal with a blend of spices. (No alcohol.)

32-36 Upper Tooting Rd, Tooting
London SW17 7PD, UK

12. Karachi Cuisine

1113-1115 London Rd, Norbury, London SW16 4XD, UK
Kat a Kat at Karachi Cuisine in Norbury, south west London
Kat a Kat at Karachi Cuisine
Rida Bilgrami

Karachi Cuisine prides itself in having chefs and staff that all hail from Karachi, Pakistan’s largest metropolis. It comes as no surprise that it is one of the few Pakistani restaurants in London serving two of the city’s specialties: kat a kat and maghaz masala. Both dishes epitomise Pakistan’s nose to tail cooking tradition, which has existed for decades, long before the term entered the mainstream discourse in Europe and North America. Maghaz masala, buttery in consistency, are blanched lamb brains simmered in a wok with tomatoes, onions, green peppers, and ginger. Kat a kat refers to the sound of two sharp blades that hit the griddle as the chef dexterously dices and minces a medley of brain, liver, kidneys, and heart and tosses it with onions, tomatoes and spices including aniseed, mace and cumin. (BYOB.)

1113-1115 London Rd, Norbury
London SW16 4XD, UK

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