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A spread of dim sum and Sichuan dishes from My Old China, in Acton.
A spread of dim sum and Sichuan dishes from My Old China, in Acton.
My Old China

The Best Restaurants in Acton

Outstanding dim sum, a phenomenal Brazilian pub, and plenty of sushi

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A spread of dim sum and Sichuan dishes from My Old China, in Acton.
| My Old China

Like near neighbour Ealing, Acton’s restaurants can be mapped by that asphalt monolith the Uxbridge Road, as it runs out of Ealing Common, into Acton, and on into Shepherd’s Bush. Largely clustered there, on the Churchfield Road tributary, and then out north towards Hanger Lane, the area’s best restaurants take in regional Chinese cooking, Serbian specialism, plenty of sushi and udon, and the food of Jamaica, Pakistan, and Portugal.

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Hua Imperial Palace 华庭軒

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Edging on to the Park Royal industrial estate but not quite part of it, Hua Imperial Palace is the new home for cooking from Kang Dong, who formerly ran an eponymous business out of Hoxton. This restaurant rewards the principle of scanning for diversions from the norm the menu establishes for itself. So on a menu mostly anchored in Anglo-Cantonese takeaway classics — of which Singapore noodles, chow meins, spring rolls, and particular lesser-spotted salt and pepper chips are executed to a good standard — look for numbing dan dan noodles rich with sesame; salted egg yolk prawns; Fujian pork soup; a decent rendition of hong shao rou hiding under “braised pork belly,”; and hand-pulled Lanzhou la mian.

Atariya Foods West Acton

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With its Ealing Common sushi bar forced to close, Atari-Ya’s West Acton location — which is primarily a shop — has taken over the mantle for outstanding, simple Japanese food. The sushi is as excellent as diners could expect coming from one of the city’s premier fish suppliers, and the donburi topped with fatty tuna, spring onion, and ikura is one of the most satisfying lunches in the area.

My Old China

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From a welcomingly large dining room, My Old China delivers two genres in the annals of Chinese cooking with aplomb: the art of dim sum and the culinary culture of Sichuan province. Har gao, siu mai, Teochew fun guo; and chewy but charred lo bak go are stand outs in the former, while the latter’s best bets are mapo tofu and laziji, the latter a headily ferocious pile of fried chicken, facing heaven chillis, Sichuan peppercorn, and doubanjiang.

In a former pub clad with pool table and jukebox, Acton residents now find Mendes, Rogerio and Maria’s tribute to Madeiran cooking and its intersection with that of Brazil. Look for franguinho da guia, a butterflied, aggressively grilled baby chicken sour and fragrant with lemon and chilli, or its baby cousin frango passarinho, a more Brazilian preparation fried after being marinated in lime, salt, and garlic. With some bolo do caco, batata frita, and cold beers, there’s little to beat it in the area.

Hasu Sushi

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This simple little room on Churchfield Road turns out a reliably excellent menu of sushi standards, from slightly outrageous maki (scallops, spicy mayonnaise, spring onion...) to “Hasu style” sushi, which includes a fine tuna sashimi with yuzu and chilli. But don’t skimp out on decent tempura and some craggy kaarage with a formidable fermented chilli sauce, or on colder days, a commendable shoyu-style ramen, delicate and rich with miso.

Blue Collar Speciality Coffee

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From a tiny blue van on some (currently) windswept playing fields in North Acton, Luca and Marco serve by far the best coffee in the area. Billing themselves as Italians swept up by the rise of “third wave” coffee, they pair expertly made espressos and flat whites with pastries their country would be proud of, particularly a generously filled pistachio croissant. When closed (Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday) Buono makes a fine alternative.

Roasted

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At first glance, the loose union between Roasted’s menu — meat cooked low and slow, which means French-style beef cheeks and American barbecue appear on the same menu — raises uneasy thoughts of jack-of-all-trades. But it turns out to be a master of all, and a kind of monument to the fact that meat, fire, and time, whether applied to a lacquered, candied barbecue glaze on some ribs or a deep, glossy demi-glace over those beef cheeks, is common ground worth standing on.

A Pint of Hops

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A Pint of Hops and near-neighbour Vindinista are where those in search of craft beer and wine respectively need to go.

Ezo Japanese Noodle and Sushi

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Per its name, Ezo casts a slightly wider net than near neighbour Hasu, with both shoyu and tonkotsu ramens and nutty, tousled soba to go with thicker, springier udon. It does a few nifty things elsewhere, offering aburi on fish fatty enough to take the torching, as well as a miso black cod that doesn’t require diners to remortage their house.

Kod Pirketa

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Kod Pirketa is part of a modest clutch of Serbian restaurants (Corner Terrace, Chicken and Cevapi) in Ealing and Acton, with Montenegro represented by Mugi’s on Ealing Common. Where C and C has cevapi and a photo spot for influencers, Dejan Stojanov’s Kod Pirketa has cevapi, tablecloths and Serbian folk music, alongside the grill-kissed, spiced meat. Come for ustipici sputtering from the fryer; karadordeva snicla, golden schnitzel rolled and stuffed with rich kajmak; and jagnjetina ipsod saca, lamb cooked “under the bell” in an earthenware pot with potatoes, herbs, and carrots that comes out as tender as a bruise. Sink a couple of Jelen pivo beers alongside.

Miod Malina Restaurant

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Per Eater contributor Stephen Buranyi, what makes Miod Malina a star of the city’s Polish restaurant firmament is a conscientious devotion to dishes that haven’t made their way into international culinary vernacular. Soups of chicken and sour rye are muscular, tangy, and impossibly warming, while placek po węgiersku, an Hungarian style potato pancake with served with a goulash, is a regular special alongside pork cutlets and zraz wolowy, a beef roulade stewed and served in its own juices.

Ku Sheng Peng

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Originally a private catering business, Donna and Donovan’s Jamaican restaurant and rum bar began life in late 2020, and was unable to open fully until mid-2021. But since then it has hit its stride, with weekly changing soups like cow foot and peas; and carefully made staples like oxtail, curry goat, and brown stew. Add an enviable rum collection and beautifully jerked pork grilled over charcoal, and it’s easy to see why Ku-Sheng Peng has slotted into Acton so quickly.

Yasmina Restaurant and Bakery

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This little T-junction corner spot off the asphalt roar of the Westway bills itself as a Lebanese restaurant and bakery, but perhaps it should be other way around. Specialising in man’oushe, Yasmina — with head baker and chef Ramadan at the helm — is peerless. A long-running “battle” with Zeit and Za’atar — still excellent — one thoroughfare south on the Uxbridge road can be surrendered with a single bite, burnished crust giving way to a bread so light it might have been secretly inflated with a bike pump. It’s not: it’s all in the bake, best hot from the oven with za’atar, spiced mince lamb, or garlic sauce whose pop belies its beige. Little has changed here, despite so much having changed.

Hua Imperial Palace 华庭軒

Edging on to the Park Royal industrial estate but not quite part of it, Hua Imperial Palace is the new home for cooking from Kang Dong, who formerly ran an eponymous business out of Hoxton. This restaurant rewards the principle of scanning for diversions from the norm the menu establishes for itself. So on a menu mostly anchored in Anglo-Cantonese takeaway classics — of which Singapore noodles, chow meins, spring rolls, and particular lesser-spotted salt and pepper chips are executed to a good standard — look for numbing dan dan noodles rich with sesame; salted egg yolk prawns; Fujian pork soup; a decent rendition of hong shao rou hiding under “braised pork belly,”; and hand-pulled Lanzhou la mian.

Atariya Foods West Acton

With its Ealing Common sushi bar forced to close, Atari-Ya’s West Acton location — which is primarily a shop — has taken over the mantle for outstanding, simple Japanese food. The sushi is as excellent as diners could expect coming from one of the city’s premier fish suppliers, and the donburi topped with fatty tuna, spring onion, and ikura is one of the most satisfying lunches in the area.

My Old China

From a welcomingly large dining room, My Old China delivers two genres in the annals of Chinese cooking with aplomb: the art of dim sum and the culinary culture of Sichuan province. Har gao, siu mai, Teochew fun guo; and chewy but charred lo bak go are stand outs in the former, while the latter’s best bets are mapo tofu and laziji, the latter a headily ferocious pile of fried chicken, facing heaven chillis, Sichuan peppercorn, and doubanjiang.

Mendes

In a former pub clad with pool table and jukebox, Acton residents now find Mendes, Rogerio and Maria’s tribute to Madeiran cooking and its intersection with that of Brazil. Look for franguinho da guia, a butterflied, aggressively grilled baby chicken sour and fragrant with lemon and chilli, or its baby cousin frango passarinho, a more Brazilian preparation fried after being marinated in lime, salt, and garlic. With some bolo do caco, batata frita, and cold beers, there’s little to beat it in the area.

Hasu Sushi

This simple little room on Churchfield Road turns out a reliably excellent menu of sushi standards, from slightly outrageous maki (scallops, spicy mayonnaise, spring onion...) to “Hasu style” sushi, which includes a fine tuna sashimi with yuzu and chilli. But don’t skimp out on decent tempura and some craggy kaarage with a formidable fermented chilli sauce, or on colder days, a commendable shoyu-style ramen, delicate and rich with miso.

Blue Collar Speciality Coffee

From a tiny blue van on some (currently) windswept playing fields in North Acton, Luca and Marco serve by far the best coffee in the area. Billing themselves as Italians swept up by the rise of “third wave” coffee, they pair expertly made espressos and flat whites with pastries their country would be proud of, particularly a generously filled pistachio croissant. When closed (Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday) Buono makes a fine alternative.

Roasted

At first glance, the loose union between Roasted’s menu — meat cooked low and slow, which means French-style beef cheeks and American barbecue appear on the same menu — raises uneasy thoughts of jack-of-all-trades. But it turns out to be a master of all, and a kind of monument to the fact that meat, fire, and time, whether applied to a lacquered, candied barbecue glaze on some ribs or a deep, glossy demi-glace over those beef cheeks, is common ground worth standing on.

A Pint of Hops

A Pint of Hops and near-neighbour Vindinista are where those in search of craft beer and wine respectively need to go.

Ezo Japanese Noodle and Sushi

Per its name, Ezo casts a slightly wider net than near neighbour Hasu, with both shoyu and tonkotsu ramens and nutty, tousled soba to go with thicker, springier udon. It does a few nifty things elsewhere, offering aburi on fish fatty enough to take the torching, as well as a miso black cod that doesn’t require diners to remortage their house.

Kod Pirketa

Kod Pirketa is part of a modest clutch of Serbian restaurants (Corner Terrace, Chicken and Cevapi) in Ealing and Acton, with Montenegro represented by Mugi’s on Ealing Common. Where C and C has cevapi and a photo spot for influencers, Dejan Stojanov’s Kod Pirketa has cevapi, tablecloths and Serbian folk music, alongside the grill-kissed, spiced meat. Come for ustipici sputtering from the fryer; karadordeva snicla, golden schnitzel rolled and stuffed with rich kajmak; and jagnjetina ipsod saca, lamb cooked “under the bell” in an earthenware pot with potatoes, herbs, and carrots that comes out as tender as a bruise. Sink a couple of Jelen pivo beers alongside.

Miod Malina Restaurant

Per Eater contributor Stephen Buranyi, what makes Miod Malina a star of the city’s Polish restaurant firmament is a conscientious devotion to dishes that haven’t made their way into international culinary vernacular. Soups of chicken and sour rye are muscular, tangy, and impossibly warming, while placek po węgiersku, an Hungarian style potato pancake with served with a goulash, is a regular special alongside pork cutlets and zraz wolowy, a beef roulade stewed and served in its own juices.

Ku Sheng Peng

Originally a private catering business, Donna and Donovan’s Jamaican restaurant and rum bar began life in late 2020, and was unable to open fully until mid-2021. But since then it has hit its stride, with weekly changing soups like cow foot and peas; and carefully made staples like oxtail, curry goat, and brown stew. Add an enviable rum collection and beautifully jerked pork grilled over charcoal, and it’s easy to see why Ku-Sheng Peng has slotted into Acton so quickly.

Yasmina Restaurant and Bakery

This little T-junction corner spot off the asphalt roar of the Westway bills itself as a Lebanese restaurant and bakery, but perhaps it should be other way around. Specialising in man’oushe, Yasmina — with head baker and chef Ramadan at the helm — is peerless. A long-running “battle” with Zeit and Za’atar — still excellent — one thoroughfare south on the Uxbridge road can be surrendered with a single bite, burnished crust giving way to a bread so light it might have been secretly inflated with a bike pump. It’s not: it’s all in the bake, best hot from the oven with za’atar, spiced mince lamb, or garlic sauce whose pop belies its beige. Little has changed here, despite so much having changed.

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